The Beer Chronicles

All about beer

Posts Tagged ‘types of beer

What Beer Are You Serving?

with 2 comments

The other day I was with a gentleman, who is in the process of setting up a microbrewery/ brewpub. While a lot of detailing was in place about the location, feel of the interiors, licencing, identifying prospect places to buy their equipment from, it seemed few measures had been taken to identify the brews that would eventually be served at the brewpub.

The kind of resources that we have today, makes it possible to have 16 billion different brews. I was reading that there are about 150 varieties of malt extracts, 15 specialty grains, 25 hops, and 32 yeast varieties which are available to the brewer today. Given this fact, it is important to consider what brew is being served to the customer.

A good way to launch a brewpub is to get the brewing licence for a good international brand and introduce the flavours to the local market, or brew your own. While a good consultant should help you achieve the former, a good brewmaster would be able to deliver a good brew based on resources available, taste and likeability factor by the customers.

While personal choice is important when considering what to serve like a stout, a lager, an ale or even flavored beer like strawberry, cranberry and so on, one must also think on the following while answering what to brew?

Competition: You may be the first to open a brewpub in a city, or setting up in a place, where a brewpub already exists. So what would differentiate you? It will be wise to peep into the neighborhood taverns, pubs, restrobars, brewpubs and profile the place vis-a-vis menu, seating, entertainment options, theme etc. Doing this successfully will give you a heads-up in doing your own brewpub and also understanding what kind of brew your customers would like and what kind of food can be paired along with it.

Clientele: Once you have got a hang of what your competition offers or doesnot offer, profiling customers is the next thing to realise your brew potential. Are you targetting the absolute beer enthusiasts, the young college going crowd, working professionals, creative people or a mix of all. Once you have identified the kind of clientle which will be walking into your brewpub it would be easier for you to identify the right brew to be served. You can perhaps engage your prospect clientele with a survey about their liking or if there is a possibility to do small tasting sessions with select group of people. This will give you deep insights about their preferences and willingness to experiment. I had done an earlier post on the types of Beer available. You may find it useful here.

Having answered “What Beer are you Serving?” it will also lead you to asking, “How big should your Brewery be? What is the capacity of equipment’s that one should order etc.  Since it will be a bit of lengthy post,  I will take it up next 🙂

Advertisements

Written by admin

August 1, 2011 at 8:29 pm

Types of Beer

with one comment

People have been drinking beer for centuries now and since then Beer has evolved into many different types. There are two primary types of beer, Ales and Lagers. These two classes of beer collectively make up thousands of different varieties of beer.

The first difference between these two types is the temperature at which the beer is fermented. Ales are fermented at higher temperatures 18-21 degree Celsius, whereas Lagers are fermented in colder temperature at about 7-11 degree Celsius.

However both Ales and Lagers contain hops, malted barley, yeast and water.

In Ales and Lagers classes there are many different beers. Following is the hierarchy of many types of beer. Though this is not the complete list, since the types could be numerous.

types of beer - ale

The other difference between these two types is the type of yeast used to brew them. Ale uses yeast that ferments best at warmer temperatures. Ales generally use top fermenting yeast. This means that the yeast floats on the surface for the first few days and then settles on the bottom. While Lager uses yeast that ferments best at cooler temperatures. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast, which does not float to the surface before settling.

types of beer - lager

Reference: Drinking Beer

Written by admin

April 25, 2011 at 4:15 pm